Saturday, August 25, 2012

Completely Conspicuous 241: Go It Alone

Part 3 of my conversation with guest Brian Salvatore as we discuss our favorite solo artists. Listen to the episode below or download it directly.
Show notes:
- Re-recorded via Skype
- Jay: Robert Plant's music has evolved since Zeppelin's breakup
- Brian: John,  Paul and George in a three-way tie

- Harrison's All Things Must Pass is a standout
- McCartney's good when he works with others (Elvis Costello, Youth)
- Jay: Favorite solo artist is Pete Townshend
- His three early '80s solo albums were excellent
- Last 25 years have been focused on Who tours
- Brian: Top pick is Frank Black
- He's consistently made good records since Pixies split- Jay: Rod Stewart's solo career has been mostly awful
- His work in Faces, Jeff Beck Group and first few solo releases was strong
- Brian: Jagger should not be allowed to make solo albums
- Jay: Keith Richards' solo work is good
- Jay: The four guys in Sloan should each release solo records simultaneously a la KISS
- Brian: Steven Drozd would make an interesting solo album

- Brian: Rivers Cuomo should make a stripped-down, non-Weezer record
- Bonehead of the Week

Music:
Robert Plant - Little Hands

Frank Black and the Catholics - Nadine
Sloan - Coax Me

Completely Conspicuous is available through the iTunes podcast directory. Subscribe and write a review!

The Robert Plant song is on the compilation More Oar: A Tribute to the Skip Spence Album on Birdman Records. Download it for free from Epitonic.
The Frank Black and the Catholics song is on the album Show Me Your Tears on SpinART. Download the song for free from Epitonic.
The Sloan song is on the album Twice Removed on Geffen. Download the song for free (in exchange for your email address) at NoiseTrade.
The opening and closing theme of Completely Conspicuous is "Theme to Big F'in Pants" by Jay Breitling. Find out more about Senor Breitling at his fine music blog Clicky Clicky. Voiceover work is courtesy of James Gralian; check out his site PodGeek.

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